The Charlotte Coliseum

The Charlotte Coliseum

  Administrative  
Address 100 Paul Buck Boulevard
Charlotte, NC 28217
Phone (704) 357-4700
Official Website
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  The Facility  
Date Built 1988
Date Demolished June 3, 2007
Ownership
(Management)
City of Charlotte
(City of Charlotte)
Cost of Construction $52 Million
Arena Financing 100% publicly funded
Architects Odell Associates
  Other Facts  
Tenants Charlotte Sting (WNBA)
Charlotte Rage (AF)
Carolina Cobras
(AFL) (2002)
Former Tenants Charlotte Hornets
(NBA) (1988-2002)
Charlotte Bobcats
(NBA) (2004-2005)
Population Base 1,500,000
On Site Parking 8,000
Nearest Airport Unknown
  Seating  
Basketball 24,042
Prices
(Mean)
$75, $54, $48, $39, $34, $25, $18, $13, $9
($28.00) - 1998
Hockey 21,684
Concerts 23,780
Boxing 23,041
Luxury Suites 12 Suites
Club Seats None
  Attendance History  
Season  Total  Capacity Change
2001-02 462,738 -46.9% -24.8%
2000-01 615,424 75.3% -16.0%
1999-00 732,827 74% 52.4%
1998-99 480,807 80% -49.9%
1997-98 959,616 97% -2.7%
1996-97 985,722 100% 0%
1995-96 985,722 100% 1.5%
1994-95 971,618 99% 0%
1993-94 971,618 99% 0%
1992-93 971,618 99% 0%
 
1998-99 - Attendance for 25 games due to NBA lockout.

Sources: Mediaventures

The circular Coliseum is a great place to watch basketball. Former owner George Shinn mingled with the crowd, and because so many season tickets are sold, it seems that everyone in the crowd knows everybody else. Fans treat the game like a big family night out and frequently come early for tailgate parties. In a further sign of togetherness, the crowd often actually joins together for a pregame prayer..

The fans and players have a great relationship. Most of the players make their homes in the area, and they are treated like genuine heros. People here are basketball hungry, and while ACC fans and NBA fans aren't the same animal, the atmosphere can be decidedly collegiate in its enthusiasm and unquestioning support.

But this high-tech arena has attractions other than fans. The scoreboard has crystal-clear replays, and six other message boards are scattered throughout the arena. SuperHugo, the Hornet's mascot, wears a blue bodysuit with black sunglasses and is a three-time winner of the NBA mascot slam-dunk championship. The Hornets also net a more lucrative accomplishment: their stylish paraphernalia, designed by Alexander Julian, is among the biggest sellers in the league.

Source: Fodor's Four Sport Stadium Guide

Directions to the Charlotte Coliseum

(From the Airport): Follow main exit out of the airport approximately one mile. At the entrance fork of Billy Graham Parkway (north is I-85; south is I-77), bear right, going south on I-77. After two traffic lights, exit right onto Tyvola Road/Coliseum Area. Bear right off exit ramp onto Tyvola Road.

Miscellaneous Facts
120Exit Doors.
110Acres occupied by The Coliseum.
16Turnstiles in Main Lobby.
8,000On-site Parking Spaces.
19Restrooms.
14Concession Stands.
120Feet floor to roof.
$47.4million cost (through voter-approved bonds)
7,000Square Feet for the Hospitality Room.
4Team Rooms, 1,100 Square Feet.
5Star Rooms, 150 Square Feet.
40Feet wide Scoreboard, 8-sided, 4-9'x12' video screens with 200,000 lights
3,500tons of Steel in the Facility.
465,000Square feet, the total area of the The Coliseum.

THIRD PARTNER NEEDED TO BUILD NEW ARENA IN CHARLOTTE
May 6, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

The Hornets say a developer must be part of a three way deal to build a new arena for the city. The team believes by having the team, the city and the developer each pay a third, the project presents fewer risks for all involved, especially since the Hornets are the only professional tenant.

A city committee is looking into the feasibility of a new arena, where one might be built and how it might be financed. The team's comments come as the committee nears the end of its work.

The new arena is projected to cost up to $250 million and the team's position could be strengthened by the possible addition of former Bulls star Michael Jordan as an owner.

COMMITTEE PROPOSES THAT HORNETS PAY 70 PERCENT OF NEW ARENA
May 20, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

A committee investigating the feasibility of a new arena for Charlotte says the Hornets should pay 70% toward a new arena to house the team that's estimated to cost up to $250 million. If the arena bids come in at the full $250 million, the team would be on the hook for $175 million. The group voted that in no case should the team pay less than $100 million toward the project.

Team officials were not comfortable with the 70/30 split and indicated the $100 million figure was closer to what they had in mind. An earlier proposal that the team pay 60% of the cost failed a committee vote.

The team wants to be in a new arena by 2004 because the 11-year-old Charlotte Coliseum no longer meets the team's needs. The venue has 12 luxury suites and no club seats. The committee is due to release a final report in June.

HORNETS SAY 70% PLAN WON'T FLY
May 27, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

The Charlotte Hornets say they cannot afford a proposed plan that calls for them to pay 70% of the cost of a new $225 million arena. In fact, 60% is even beyond their reach. A committee looking into the viability, financing and location of a proposed new arena has suggested the team pay 70% of the cost. The final report is due next month.

The team says the committee's evaluation does not take into account the taxes the team must pay and other expenses it has. Instead the team is offering three other proposals. In one, the team invests $60 million in the project. A second has the team investing $80 million to be matched by the city with the balance coming from other sources such as naming rights sales, a car rental tax or a ticket tax. A third proposal, without financials attached, suggests that the team, not the city, own the arena.

On other issues, the committee has decided the arena should seat 20,000 persons, have up to 80 luxury suites and 2,500 club seats. Five possible locations have also been chosen. A minority group has also emerged from the committee saying it does not agree with the proposals and that it will submit a report of its own. The group's leader declined to identify the members of the dissenting group and what they intend to say in their report.

PUBLIC VOTE RECOMMENDED ON HORNETS ARENA
June 17, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

If public investment is high, the city should put the issue of a new arena for the Charlotte Hornets to a public vote, according to one member of the committee studying the issue. The committee member, Alan Wells, asked that the recommendation be included in the final report. He expects several other committee members to support his proposal.

The committee is expected to approve its final report Monday that calls for up to $100 million in public funds for an arena estimated to cost nearly $250 million. Funding would come from the team, and a combination of a car rental tax, state money, ticket surcharges and sale of the Coliseum where the team now plays.

The proposal suggests the team would invest up to $125 million in the new arena, but team officials say that is much too high for them to be profitable.

The report's draft calls for a new arena to support the NBA team, but also an NHL team or minor league hockey team, should one want to use the facility. The report also suggests four possible locations for the arena, including the lot where the Charlotte Coliseum now rests.

The venue would have 80 luxury suites and 2,500 club seats. No recommendation was made as to how the revenue would be divided or who would own the venue.

Even before the report has been released, it is drawing complaints. Some county commissioners say there is no public money available to contribute to the arena and the committee should recognize that. The draft does not recommend that the county contribute, but only recognizes it as a possible revenue source. The county is now in a financial bind and is considering raising taxes or cutting services to meet its needs.

CITIZENS PUSH FOR REFERENDUM ON Charlotte Bobcats Arena
July 1, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

Citizens lined up before the Charlotte City Council this week to call for a referendum on a new Hornets arena as a committee charged with investigating the issue delivered its 200 page report. Citizens groups, along with some committee members speaking as private citizens, urged the council to put the issue to a vote.

The report says the team should invest $115 million to $135 million in the proposed $250 million arena. The Hornets say that is too expensive and they can only afford to put $80 million to $100 million into the project. The report also says property tax money should not be used for the construction and that it should not be built before 2004, a date that fits into the team's plans.

The Hornets want a new arena to replace the Coliseum which has only 12 luxury suites and no club seats.

NEW HORNETS INVESTOR ANXIOUS TO HELP BUILD NEW ARENA
August 5, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

Ray Wooldridge, a new investor in the Charlotte Hornets, says one of his first priorities is to help the team build a new arena. Wooldridge, an Atlanta businessman, reportedly owns about 35% of the team and has the right to increase that stake to 50% or buy out his partner, George Shinn.

Shinn has been facing problems with a new arena partially because of financing and partially because he is facing possible criminal charges for sexual misconduct. A Charlotte woman has filed a civil suit against Shinn.

Wooldridge is now expected to be the public face on the team's efforts to win a new venue. Shinn had earlier talked with former Chicago Bull Michael Jordan about investing, but the deal fell through because Jordan wanted control of both the basketball and business operations.

A committee recently studied the need for a new arena and issued a report supporting the idea. The report says the team should invest $115 million to $135 million in the proposed $250 million arena. The Hornets say that is too expensive and they can only afford to put $80 million to $100 million into the project. The report also says property tax money should not be used for the construction and that it should not be built before 2004, a date that fits into the team's plans.

The Hornets want a new arena to replace the Coliseum which has only 12 luxury suites and no club seats.

CHARLOTTE VOTERS WON'T VOTE ON ARENA ISSUE
September 16, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

The Charlotte (NC) City Council has decided against asking voter approval about spending public money for a new sports arena, but pledged to hold an election if property tax money is used. The council's vote comes as the city prepares for a city council election and gives incumbents a chance to stake out positions on the issue. Opponents of the arena issue say because it is unlikely that property tax money would ever be used, that the council's decision is meaningless.

Last June, some members of a committee charged with developing an arena plan wanted to include the election recommendation in their report. The members suggested that if public investment is high, the city should put the issue of a new arena to a public vote. The committee proposal calls for up to $100 million in public funds for an arena estimated to cost nearly $250 million. Funding would come from the team, and a combination of a car rental tax, state money, ticket surcharges and sale of the Coliseum where the team now plays.

The proposal suggests the team would invest up to $125 million in the new arena, but team officials say that is much too high for them to be profitable.

The report calls for a new arena to support the NBA team, but also an NHL team or minor league hockey team, should one want to use the facility. The report also suggests four possible locations for the arena, including the lot where the Charlotte Coliseum now rests.

The venue would have 80 luxury suites and 2,500 club seats. No recommendation was made as to how the revenue would be divided or who would own the venue.

HORNETS NEW OWNER ASKS FOR DELAY IN ARENA TALKS
November 11, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

Ray Wooldridge, new co-owner of the Charlotte Hornets has asked city officials to cancel a planned meeting to discuss building a new arena. Wooldridge told city officials he has only been on the job a few weeks and has been consumed with other team issues. He is asking for additional time to study the issue and come to the meeting more prepared.

City officials say they are happy to accommodate Wooldridge and believe he will use the time to develop a proposal to put before them. For that reason, they believe the delay may actually be beneficial to the process.

A citizens group studying the need for a new arena issued a report in June. The report says the team should invest $115 million to $135 million in the proposed $250 million arena. The Hornets said that is too expensive and they can only afford to put $80 million to $100 million into the project. The report also says property tax money should not be used for the construction and that it should not be built before 2004, a date that fits into the team's plans. Shortly after that report, Wooldridge joined the team as an investor.

The meeting was intended to lay out a time line for negotiations on the project and city officials hope Wooldridge will offer up more team money for the project. Wooldridge will take over development of the arena for the team in hopes of defusing an often contentious relationship between the city and George Shinn, the other co-owner.

Charlotte Hornets / Oklahoma City Hornets / New Orleans Hornets

Charlotte
Coliseum

Charlotte Coliseum

1988-2002
New Orleans
Arena

New Orleans Arena

2002-2005
Oklahoma
City Arena

Oklahoma City Arena

2005-2007
Pete Maravich
Assembly Center

Pete Maravich Assembly Center

2005-2006
Lloyd Noble Center
Lloyd Noble Center Center

2005-2006
New Orleans Arena
New Orleans Arena

2007-Present

Charlotte Bobcats

Charlotte Coliseum
Charlotte Coliseum

2004-2005
Time Warner Cable Arena
Time Warner Cable Arena

2005-Present



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