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The Boston Garden
The Boston Garden

  Venue Resources  
Address 150 Causeway Street,
Boston, Ma 02114
Seating Weather
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Hotels, Dining & Deals in Boston

  The Facility  
Date Built November 17, 1928
Date Closed September 28, 1995
Date Demolished November 1997
Ownership
(Management)
Delaware North Companies
(Delaware North Companies)
Cost of Construction $4 Million
Former Names Boston Madison Square Garden
Capacity 14,448
  Other Facts  
Former Tenants Boston Celtics
(NBA) (1946-1995)
Boston Bruins
(NHL) (1928-1995)
New England Whalers
(WHA) (1972-1974)
Boston Braves
(AHL) (1971-1974)
Boston Blazers
(NLL) (1992-1995)
Population Base 4,600,000
On Site Parking Unknown
Nearest Airport Logan International Airport (BOS)
Retired Numbers #1 Walter Brown
#2 Red Auerbach
#3 Dennis Johnson
#6 Bill Russell
#10 Jo Jo White
#14 Bob Cousy
#15 Tom Heinsohn
#16 Tom Sanders
#17 John Havlicek
#18 Dave Cowens
#18 Jim Loscutoff
#19 Don Nelson
#21 Bill Sharman
#22 Ed Macauley
#23 Frank Ramsey
#24 Sam Jones
#25 K. C. Jones
#32 Kevin McHale
#33 Larry Bird
#35 Reggie Lewis
Red Auerbach

Championships 1st

1957
2nd

1959
3rd

1960
4th

1961
5th

1962
6th

1963
7th

1964
8th

1965
  9th

1966
10th

1968
11th

1969
12th

1974
13th

1976
14th

1981
15th

1984<
16th

1986


Sources: Mediaventures

The parquet floor will be making the transition from the Boston Garden into the FleetCenter - the Celtics' new home. The parquet floor is the focus of fascination for many fans and the following is a sampling of the questions that tend to be asked:

Q. Is this the same floor that was used from the original days of the Celtics?

A. In 1946, Celtics Owner Walter Brown planned a basketball floor to be built in Boston Arena (presently the home of Northeastern University's Huskies and has been renamed the Mathews Arena) where the Celtics played home games along with Boston Garden. Pieces of the floor have replaced over the years; however, some of the pieces may be the same as used in 1946 when the floor was originally built.

Q. How was the floor built?

A. It was built in 1946 of hardwood, from a forest in Tennessee, originally used to build barracks during World War II. The cost was in the $10,000-$11,000 range. The floor was manufactured because of a shortage of materials following World War II. This shortage caused the East Boston Lumber Company to construct the floor from scraps, fitting them together in an alternation pattern. The original parquet floor was moved from Boston Arena to Boston Garden in December, 1952.

Q. How many squares of parquet are used and what are the dimensions?

A.The parquet floor has 247 panels, each approximately 5'-by-5' and 11/2" thick. The panels are held together by wood planks and brass screws, with the help of 988 bolts. The floor is pieced together in two and 1/2 hours by a group of men known as the "Bull Gang."

Q. How many bolts does it take to secure the floor?

A. There are 988 bolts used.

Q. Where are the dead spots?

A. From Red Auerbach: "The parquet floor is synonymous with the Celtics. It is a good floor, a very good floor. The so-called dead spots on the floor? If teams felt it was a poor floor, I used it for an advantage by playing with their minds. That usually worked. When teams did beat us on the rare occasion, they never complained. The strange thing was that there were more dead spots in old Madison Square Garden than in Boston. Believe me, I played and coached there on many occasions; I know."

Q. When was the logo put at center court?

A. 1973.

Garden
Image of the The Boston Garden in 1988 by David A. Litterer whom we thank very much

Email Note: John Tyler states "I would like to bring to your attention the item in this history of the Boston Garden. In the retrospective of when the Celtics logo was placed, you have listed the wrong date. It can't be 1973 because I have tape of the 1974 NBA Finals between Milwaukee and Boston and the logo is not there. I imagine it was the 74-75 season because in seeing the 76 Finals, the logo was there. Please do check file tape of this fact and I ensure that this is so. Thank you."

Q. What about the resurfacing of the floor?

A. It was laid in 1946, and has been resurfaced several times including 1972, 1993, and in 1995 when the floor was moved into the FleetCenter.

Plans Expected for Boston Site
May 6, 2001
SportsBusiness Journal

Delaware North Companies, owner of the FleetCenter, reportedly was poised last week to complete a deal with a Boston-area real estate developer to plan and develop a site in front of the arena, a parking lot where the Boston Garden once stood. According to a Boston Globe report, the development could include three office towers of up to 30 stories with a mix of retail, office and hotel space; a possible six-story atrium; and the addition of significant square footage to the arena itself that could be used to expand existing concourses.

Boston Celtics

Boston
Arena

Boston Arena

1946-1955
Civic
Center

Civic Center

1975-1995
Boston
Garden

Boston Garden

1946-1995
TD
Garden

TD Garden

1995-Present

Boston Bruins

Boston Arena
Boston Arena

1924-1928
Boston Garden
Boston Garden

1928-1995
TD Garden
TD Garden

1995-Present

New England Whalers / Hartford Whalers / Carolina Hurricanes

Boston
Garden

Boston Garden

1972-1974
Boston
Arena

Boston Arena

1972-1973
Eastern States
Coliseum

Eastern States Coliseum
1973-1975
Springfield
Civic Center

Springfield Civic Center

1974-1975
Hartford Civic
Center Arena

Hartford Civic Center Arena

1974-1978
Springfield
Civic Center

Springfield Civic Center

1976-1979
Hartford Civic
Center Arena

Hartford Civic Center Arena

1979-1997
Greensboro
Coliseum

Greensboro Coliseum

1997-1999
RBC Center
RBC Center

1999-Present


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